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Cape May Winery & Vineyard  

June Vineyard Update


June 5th 2019

Pictured Here: The flowers of grapevines are called perfect flowers because they are self-pollinating- there is no need for bees.
Right now, our vines look like they are covered with tiny grape bunches, but these mini-bunches are actually protective caps for future grapes. When the vine is ready, the caps bursts open to reveal the basic anatomy of a flower: a pistil and several pollen-carrying stamen. Don't expect to see petals– only off-white strings smaller than a finger nail.
Once the tiny berries appear after pollination, we begin leaf thinning. This allows for increased air movement within the vine’s canopy as well as helps to control the amount of light the grapes receive. The breeze helps keep pests at bay and the leaves intentionally left for shading help prevent sunburned grapes which can negatively affect a wine’s flavor. 

Cape May Wine

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